I'm not a big fan of New Year's resolutions, but I do think January offers us an opportunity in the rhythm of the year to reflect on what the past year has been and what we hope the coming year will be. To be sure, these reflections can spur us to actions that we might not otherwise have taken. And they might turn into "goals" or "resolutions" we hope to keep.  Perhaps more than that, they can become stories we hope to live into as the new year becomes a text we read -- or that reads us -- across the days and months ahead. 

In our newly-released curriclum for high school students, the following questions become something along those lines. They offer the possibility for students to create a narrative of their future and then take action toward living into that hoped-for future. As we kick off a new year and celebrate the release of this curriculum, we're sharing these and more in a free downloadable sample session on identity.  But perhaps these questions might be useful to you in other ways as well, for yourself or teenagers you know and love. Happy new year!

Imagine yourself a year from now. Write down words or phrases that describe who you hope to be in the following areas…

In my relationship with God, I want to be…

In my relationship with my family, I want to be…

In my relationship with friends now, I want to be…

In my relationship with new friends, I want to be…

In the way I think and feel about myself, I want to be…

In my job or studies, I want to be…

Based on the words and phrases you’ve jotted down, write a three-to-five sentence description of who you want to be a year from now:

A year from now I want to be…


Published Jan 03, 2012
Brad M. Griffin

Brad M. Griffin is the Associate Director of the Fuller Youth Institute, where he develops research-based training for youth workers and parents. A speaker, blogger, and volunteer youth pastor, Brad is also the coauthor of Sticky Faith ​and Deep Justice Journeys. A native Kentucky youth pastor, Brad now lives in Southern California with his wife Missy and their three children.

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